Tag Archives: Post-apocalyptic

The Last Day by Andrew Hunter Murray

Hutchinson | 2020 (6 February) | 416p | Review copy | Buy the book

The Last Day by Andrew Hunter MurrayIt is 2059 and thirty years have passed since the Earth finally stopped spinning, after ten years of a gradual, excruciating and catastrophic slowing. The results have devastated much of the world, with almost half plunged into constant freezing blackness and almost the other half baked into extinction by the unrelenting sun. Few parts of the planet remain habitable and, ironically, it is the Old World that has fared the best. While the New World roasts or freezes, it is Britain and northern Europe where life can continue in some form or other. Northern Europe has been transformed into the Breadbasket and it is there that all prisoners, all dissenting voices, are sent. They are sent from Britain, a nation that now sees itself as great again, commanding the seas, its borders closed as millions of refugees seek salvation. It is denied to all but the most useful. Davenport is Prime Minister and his power is absolute, the media completely controlled or removed, citizens bound by hunger, deprivation and curfew.

Dr Ellen Hopper is a scientist working on a British rig far from the south western coast of Britain in a perpetual cold twilight world. Her job is to monitor the oceans for changing patterns in the flows of the seas. She has a life there of sorts, she doesn’t want to leave. Then one day she has to. Her University mentor is dying and he wants to see Ellen before he dies. He has something vital to tell her of devastating significance. Whatever he wants to tell her, the government wants to know too and so begins a cat and mouse chase which is not only deadly for Ellen but could have untold consequences for the future of a dying humanity.

I do like a post-apocalyptic thriller and I couldn’t resist the premise of The Last Day. What makes this book especially interesting is that it tackles the subject from a British perspective and asks what might happen if the most hospitable place to live in the world turned out to be these small islands and what effect that would have on government and politics – the answer is not a good one. Which means that this is a political thriller every bit as much as it’s a post-apocalyptic/dystopian thriller.

The world building is excellent. The novel starts in the frightening world of the rig in the cold twilight, which is very much a frontier and border. It moves then to London and it’s fascinating seeing the city recreated as a place that in parts almost reminds its unhappy citizens of the old world before The Slow while other parts are clearly almost destroyed by that event. We see landmarks in ruins, people rioting, a curfew ruthlessly enforced, and empty shops and museums. And then there’s the daylight that never ends, which also has an impact on the psyche of the inhabitants, just as the relentless sun seers their skin. I especially liked the sections in my own hometown of Oxford, which was frighteningly recognisable while also being ruined.

The thriller races along. There are some great ideas and concepts in this novel and it certainly has an intriguing plot. However, I did have some issues with it, largely because I found it hard to engage with or care for any of the characters. Hopper is almost always called by her surname in the narrative and that did distance me from her further. The result is that this made the novel hard to get into. The plot, while intriguing, isn’t suspenseful, so the reveal had little impact. Nevertheless, The Last Day has a good premise and is a fun and entertaining read. Its strength is most definitely in its excellent world building, all of which is described with great skill and impact.