Light of Impossible Stars by Gareth L. Powell

Light of Impossible Stars by Gareth L PowellTitan Books | 2020 (18 February) | 367p | Review coy | Buy the book

Light of Impossible Stars completes Gareth L. Powell’s Embers of War, an excellent space opera series, if ever there was one. That means you need to have read the previous two books first: Embers of War and Fleet of Knives. This review assumes you’ve had the pleasure.

The threat to the human race increases, not just from the determined and terrifying Fleet of Knives, but also from whatever it is that the Fleet of Knives seeks to prevent. The sentient starship Trouble Dog knows better than most the danger that lies ahead and the sacrifices that will have to be made. A miracle is needed and Trouble Dog must seek it out, either with or without other members of her pack. For Trouble Dog is an unusual vessel. She was once a Carnivore-class war ship, part human, part dog and part machine. She is loyal, faithful, obedient, but now she has a mind of her own, partly due to her captain Sal Konstanz.

Meanwhile, Cordelia and her brother live on a distant world that is made of giant plates that keep their distance, physical and social, from each other. It’s a place with an alien past and Cordelia is inexplicably drawn to its ancient artefacts, which she sells to keep alive. Until the day that a spaceship arrives and snatches her away. Aboard the Gigolo Aunt, Cordelia will learn about her past and the mysterious space called The Intrusion.

I have thoroughly enjoyed the Embers of War trilogy, not just because it’s exciting and filled with adventure, battles and unfamiliar, strange worlds – and it has all of these things in abundance – but also because of its characters, especially Trouble Dog and her crew, including its engineer, the extraordinary Nod, a Druff, a creature of many legs, faces and offspring, and my favourite crew member. The relationship between Nod and its offspring is brilliantly portrayed. Do read the extract from the second novel that I posted for a taste of how wonderful this is. Trouble Dog herself is one of the most interesting space ships that I’ve read in science fiction. She evolves constantly and her relationship with her captain is integral to the novels, but the ship still retains her canine characteristics and I love that. I particularly like the scenes in which the starship personas gather together as avatars, conscious that they are more canine than human but trying to be as human as possible.

As always with these novels, there are multiple story strands weaving their way through and we move between them, driving the pace and the adventure along. I will also love the times we spend aboard Trouble Dog the most but I did like getting to know Cordelia Pa and her father.

Gareth L Powell is a compassionate writer. He writes about people with feeling and this extends to the non-human characters of the novel, whether they’re an alien or a starship. But there are also monsters in the universe, with big teeth, and they’re a lot of fun to read about. I do love a good space opera and this trilogy is a fine example and, now it’s complete (and you may have some time on your hands), I can heartily recommend it. This may well be, after all, a very good time to venture off-planet.

Other reviews and features
Embers of War
Fleet of Knives
Guest post: ‘The Recent Boom in Space Opera’
Fleet of Knives – an extract

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