The God Game by Danny Tobey

Gollancz | 2020 (9 January) | 452p | Review copy and bought copy | Buy the book

The God Game by Danny TobeyCharlie and Peter receive an invitation they can’t refuse. Messages appear on Charlie’s computer which claim to be the voice of God. He invites them to play the G.O.D. Game. If they succeed at the tasks they are set then all of their dreams will come true. If they fail or deny God, then they will die and if you die in the game then you die for real. This is the catch that Charlie, Peter, and their friends Anhi, Kenny and Alex have yet to learn but, the deeper they get into the game, carrying out the dares set to them by God and reaping the rewards, the more they realise that they are caught in a trap. Shadowy figures, mysterious packages and conflicting messages all serve to trick the friends as they discover that God intends to own them. There is no way out. God sees everything. God knows everything. Only God can end the game.

I immediately fell for the premise of The God Game and it delivers fully. It’s completely irresistible. The game that the teenagers join takes them on a series of loops, of cause and effect. They can never see the full picture and they are helplessly caught in a spiral. And it is all possible because of the society that we live in, where nothing can be hidden from cameras, microphones, hackers, games that can learn from the user’s behaviour. I really enjoyed this satirical take on the networks and programming that tie teenagers, or anyone, to their phones and computers and can manipulate them, which combines with the excitement and tension of a very enjoyable techno thriller.

The novel isn’t as Young Adult as I expected, it’s just as much Old Adult, but it does present an insightful look at the pain of being a teenager in a world controlled by social media, which makes all of the drama of growing up so many times worse. We see the world through the eyes of people who do not know who to trust, who have hopes and dreams, who fear everyone else because they’re a bit different, who are afraid of failure or of being humiliated. The teens have to deal with God but they must also deal with bullies at school, with the emotions of falling in love – usually with the wrong person – and with the expectations of parents and teachers, who are just as flawed as their children and pupils. This affects them all differently and this human drama drives the novel on, making it as emotional as it is thrilling.

The God Game is extremely exciting but there isn’t quite enough reason or explanation in it for me and, towards the end, I did feel that it’s a bit too clever for its own good. Charlie is the main character but I warmed the most to the only girl in the group, Vanhi, who is arguably the bravest of the four, the most loyal and the most self-sacrificing. I also had warm feelings for Kenny and Alex who seem to be manipulated even more than the others – served up as Abraham offered up his son Isaac to God. There are some intriguing glimpses of Old Testament theology through what is otherwise a very secular thriller.

The God Game is a real pageturner, which exceeded my expectations. It’s sharp, witty and tense and provides some real food for thought on the difficulties that teenagers have always faced but which are now arguably amplified by a digital world that never sleeps, that always watches and constantly judges and manipulates.

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