The Warehouse by Rob Hart

Bantam Press | 2019 (13 August) | 484p | Review copy | Buy the book

The Warehouse by Rob HartPaxton worked hard for years so that he could build his own business but all of that was destroyed by the Cloud, the most powerful company in the world, which sells everything to everyone (with the exception of certain forbidden books). And now Paxton has been reduced to working for the Cloud to survive. He’s one of the lucky ones. It’s a competitive business getting a job and even when he has it he discovers it’s not that easy to hang on to it. This is a world of colour-coded jobs, of stars awarded and taken away, of lengthy days, all monitored and controlled by the smartwatch on their wrists.

Paxton finds himself in a blue jumper, that means he’s security, the last job he wanted. But it could be worse. His fellow new recruit Zinnia is working in the warehouse and there she must risk her life to fulfil orders in time. The two of them are drawn together. Paxton falls in love warily and carefully. Zinnia, on the other hand, wants something and Paxton is the man to help her, whether he likes it or not. Because the creator of the Cloud, Gibson Wells, the richest and most powerful man in the USA, is about to visit.

The Warehouse, set in the not too distant future, is a timely and thought-provoking dystopian thriller. It doesn’t take the biggest imagination to work out which company is suggested by the Cloud and that does make it all the more believable and possible, and that is a terrifying thought. The American government barely exists, if it does at all. Cloud has bought out all of its services. Robots have been removed from factories. Human labour does it all now. This might mean almost everyone has a job but they’ve lost far more than they’ve gained. And then there are the ones who live outside the protected walls of the Cloud cities. They’re left to fry in the brutal sun.

Rob Hart creates a fascinating and troubling dystopian world. Plenty of time is spent on the worldbuilding and it’s vivid, stark and relentless. Chapters alternate between Paxton and Zinnia as they battle life every single day. This is reflected rather cleverly in the structure of the prose at intervals through the book. By contrast we have occasional chapters narrated by Gibson Wells, a man who has everything except what he needs the most – his health. In these final weeks he reflects on his life and the great ‘gifts’ he has bequeathed to men and women. He’s a monster who speaks with a reasonable voice, fully confident in his worth – such a man is to be feared.

There are some intriguing glimpses of an outside world in decay. Hardly anyone flies now, travel is too expensive, the world is hot and scorched, the seas have risen to claim towns. People shop themselves into oblivion, the skies are controlled by the Cloud’s drones. It’s grim but it’s also compelling stuff.

This is an espionage thriller and it is at times as exciting as it is chilling however I did have my issues with the novel. Personally, I thought it rather laboured the point, going on too long, with unconvincing, flat characters and an unsurprising twist. I really didn’t care for Zinnia and wasn’t sure whether I was supposed to or not. Her ruthlessness seems little better than Gibson’s. It is, though, an entertaining dystopian thriller, and the star of it is, for me, its thorough and disturbing worldbuilding. It’s a frightening thought – it doesn’t take long for people to accept what is very wrong to be right.

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2 thoughts on “The Warehouse by Rob Hart

  1. BookerTalk

    This sounds like its treading a path of another novel (whose name escapes me but it became a film) about some digital corporation taking over the world. Idea is good to begin with but then it just runs out of steam….

    Reply

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