A Death at Fountains Abbey by Antonia Hodgson

A Death at Fountains Abbey | Antonia Hodgson | 2016 (25 August) | Hodder & Stoughton | 356p | Review copy | Buy the book

A Death at Fountains Abbey by Antonia HodgsonTom Hawkins wants nothing more than to take a well-earned continental break with his ‘wife’ Kitty, leaving the pitfalls of London and their pornographic book business behind. George II’s Queen Caroline, though, has other plans for Tom and there’s not much he can do about it, considering that she knows more than enough about him and Kitty to see them hang at the end of a noose – again. Queen Caroline has received letters from ex-Treasurer Mr John Aislabie stating that his life is in danger and he is in need of protection. This is hardly surprising news. As the man responsible for the financial cataclysm that was the South Sea Bubble, half of England wants John Aislabie dead. The fact that the Queen sends Tom off to Aislabie’s estate in Yorkshire is a fair enough indication of how highly she values Aislabie’s life. At least it’s a break from London.

Tom and Kitty find a household in disorder. Aislabie’s past has come back from the dead to haunt him and there’s no way to know if this is connected to the death threats. It’s all an unwelcome diversion from Aislabie’s main passion (except for horses), which is to transform his estate in the latest style (for the late 1720s) and take over the next door property which has a rather pleasing ruin in its grounds – Fountains Abbey.

A Death at Fountains Abbey is the third adventure for Tom Hawkins and, like the others, it can be read as a stand alone, apart from a few light references to events from the previous novel, The Last Confession of Thomas Hawkins. Tom is attempting to turn over a new leaf a he makes a life with the irresistible and slightly dangerous Kitty and he’s probably pleased to leave his gambling and drinking haunts safely behind in London. But he can’t leave it all behind. Sam, the son of one of London’s chief gang captains, comes along as Tom’s ears and eyes. I can’t imagine one of these novels without Sam. I was so pleased he came along, although I don’t think he cared for the Yorkshire countryside very much.

The mystery at the heart of the novel is set against the grand background of a country estate that is in the process of reshaping itself according to the local fashion. Much of it is more or less a building site but there are still plenty of outdoor pursuits to enjoy (so long as not all the deer are slaughtered as gruesome warnings to Aislabie). London seems a long way away – reflecting Aislabie’s desires to leave his sins and disgrace behind. Tom finds himself in a world that is still feudal despite the spread of fashionable ideas and, although he is now far removed from the prisons of London, the penal system continues as a theme in A Death at Fountains Abbey.

Antonia Hodgson works her sources wonderfully (I loved the notes at the end of the book) and, as usual, sprinkles the story with real historical figures while creating a mystery that does them credit. Indeed, most of the characters here are historical, including Aislabie, right down to his cook, the builders and his troublesome tenants. Antonia Hodgson takes a few mentions of such figures from contemporary accounts and breathes life into them, making them every bit as three-dimensional as Tom, Kitty and Sam, who, as always, are fabulous companions – always entertaining, most definitely not entirely or even a little respectable, brave, persistent and attractive (bar the odd scar). Tom and Kitty’s relationship is not typical in the slightest but it’s a lot of fun to observe. As events here take place in a country estate there is an attempt at least to maintain a veneer of manners, particularly at the regular formal dinner, but this is clearly not even skin deep. Putting your foot in it every time you open your mouth is a trait that many of the characters in this novel have perfected.

I must confess that I did miss the London setting of the previous two novels. London was such a prominent character, as were the prisons. The stench and cruelty of the prisons and rookeries of London added a darkness and grim realism to the previous novels which is missing in A Death At Fountains Abbey. Fountains Abbey, despite the murder and mayhem, is a lighter story and the setting calmer. But Tom and Kitty deserve their respite after all that they’ve endured and, even though they manage to place themselves in as much peril as ever, there’s a strong sense that they’re enjoying the roles they’ve chosen to play. I love Antonia Hodgson’s slightly wicked sense of humour and it’s put to good use here and her clear affection for Tom and Kitty and Sam, as well as her enthusiasm for the period, is infectious. This is such a strong series and I hope it goes on and on.

Other review
The Last Confession of Thomas Hawkins

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